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Lesson 93: Triad Pairs

Triads

Let us start with major and minor triads. Possible triad pairs are:

  • a major triad and a major triad
  • a major triad and a minor triad
  • a minor triad and a minor triad

Two Triads without Common Tones

First try two triads without common tones.

Try E minor and D major played over a C in the bass and you get a C Lydian sound:

Next, try F major and G major played over a D in the bass and you get a D Dorian sound:

Next, try D minor and E minor played over a G in the bass and you get a G Mixolydian sound:

Two Triads with One Common Tone

You can also use two triads with a common tone.

Try A minor and E minor played over an F in the bass and you get an F Lydian sound:

More on Triads and Triad Pairs

A triad can also be augmented or diminished. All the possible triad pairs are then:

  • a major triad and a major triad
  • a major triad and a minor triad
  • a major triad and an augmented triad
  • a major triad and a diminished triad
  • a minor triad and a minor triad
  • a minor triad and an augmented triad
  • a minor triad and a diminished triad
  • an augmented triad and an augmented triad
  • an augmented triad and a diminished triad
  • a diminished triad and a diminished triad

This example is C major and Gb major. If played over a C in the bass it gives you a C13b9 sound:

What to Do

  • Practice triads in all inversions ( here you can see the fingerings for the different inversions of the C major and the A minor triad on strings 123 and 234)
  • Practice different triad pairs
  • Practice using triad pairs with interesting rhythms - the examples above are not very musical

2015 Tomas Karlsson. All rights reserved.